Bachelor of Science with a Major in Integrated Human Biology

The innovative integrated human biology program is designed to connect concepts from physiology, anatomy, cell biology, biochemistry and genetics, rather than separating the concepts into courses by discipline. This distinct approach allows students to achieve a unified understanding of the structure and function of the human body. The curriculum encourages both individual and collaborative learning and fosters the development of communication skills. The program emphasizes scientific process and research skills through inquiry-based labs and research-methods courses. Interested students will also have an opportunity to work with a faculty mentor to complete an original research project. Students may also take elective coursework in psychology, nutrition, herbal sciences and other disciplines that provide a broad perspective on human health.

The integrated human biology degree provides a firm foundation in biological science and fosters the development of critical thinking skills that are an excellent foundation for careers in medicine and research.

Admissions

For general information on the admissions process, please refer to the Admissions section in this catalog. The information below refers only to the Bachelor of Science with a Major in Integrated Human Biology.

Prerequisites

Entering undergraduates must have at least a 2.75 cumulative GPA with a grade of C or better in basic proficiency and science requirement courses. Prior to enrolling, students must have completed 90 quarter credits (60 semester credits), including a minimum number of credits in specific proficiencies and general education requirements. Students may apply to the program while completing prerequisite coursework. Students who have not completed all the prerequisites may not be eligible to take some courses.

Basic Proficiency and Science Requirements
English 9 quarter credits
Precalculus 4 quarter credits
General Psychology 3 quarter credits
General Cell Biology (science-major level with labs) 4 quarter credits
General Chemistry (science-major level with labs) 8 quarter credits
General Education Requirements
Arts and Humanities 15 quarter credits
Social Sciences 15 quarter credits
Public Speaking  3 quarter credits
Natural Sciences 12 quarter credits
Electives 17 quarter credits
Total 90 credits

Total prerequisite credits must equal at least 90 quarter credits. Ten credits of organic chemistry are recommended for students planning to apply to allopathic medical schools.

The number of elective credits may vary depending upon other coursework.

Expected Learning Outcomes

  • Demonstrate understanding of the scientific process and describe how scientific knowledge is developed and supported.
  • Use mathematics and quantitative reasoning appropriately to describe or analyze natural phenomena.
  • Demonstrate understanding of basic physical principles and apply these principles to living systems.
  • Demonstrate understanding of basic principles of chemistry and apply these principles to living systems.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of how biological molecules contribute to the structure and function of cells.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the link between structure and function at all levels within a living organism: molecular, microscopic and macroscopic.
  • Explain how internal environments are maintained in the face of changing external environments.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the theory of evolution by natural selection.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the biological basis for human behavior.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the connection between the human organism and the biosphere as a whole.

Graduation Requirements

Upper-division Bachelor of Science students enrolled at Bastyr University must complete a minimum of 180 credits (inclusive of credits transferred into Bastyr). To graduate, Bachelor of Science students must have a minimum 2.0 grade point average with a minimum of 45 credits in residence at Bastyr University

The curriculum tables that follow list the tentative schedule of courses each quarter. Next to each course is the number of credits per course.

Junior Year (Year I)

Fall

BC3123Organic Chemistry for Life Sciences Lecture/Lab

6

BC3139Human Biology Seminar

2

BC3148Research Methods in Human Biology 1

3

BC4116Bioethics

3

Total Credit Hours:14

*BC3123 will be waived for students who have previously taken 10 hours of Organic Chemistry. Students who plan to apply to allopathic medical schools should take the two-quarter organic sequence offered in summer.

Winter

BC3108Physics 1 Lecture/Lab

5

BC3144Integrated Biochemistry and Cell Biology

6

BC3149Research Methods in Human Biology 2

3

Total Credit Hours:14

Spring

BC3109Physics 2 Lecture/Lab

5

BC3150Biophysics 1

1

BC3151Integrated Human Biology 1 Lecture/Lab

6

BC4119Introduction to Research Proposals

2

BC9133Biotechnology and Society

2

Total Credit Hours:16

Senior Year (Year II)

Fall

BC3152Integrated Human Biology 2 Lecture/Lab

6

BC4100Microbiology Lecture/Lab

4

BC4108Biophysics 2

1

Advanced Programmatic Electives*

2

Programmatic Electives

3

Total Credit Hours:16

Winter

BC4135Biophysics 3

1

BC4153Integrated Human Biology 3 Lecture/Lab

6

BC4161Advanced Cell and Molecular Biology

4

BC9134Biology of Receptors

3

Advanced Programmatic Electives**

2

Total Credit Hours:16

Spring

BC9104Immunology

4

BC9108Pathophysiology

3

IS9115Intestinal Microbiota

3

Advanced Programmatic Electives**

4

Total Credit Hours:14

3 Credits of Programmatic Electives for Winter of the Junior Year - To Be Announced

Other courses can be taken with approval of program director.

Advanced Programmatic Electives*

BC9106Human Biology and Toxicology

3

BC9107Virology

3

BC9109Advanced Musculoskeletal Anatomy with Palpation

4

BC9112Advanced Topics in Human Biology

1

BC9119IHB Student Research

1-5 credits

BC9130Special Topics in Human Biology

variable credit

TR9130Obesity and Obesity-Related Diseases

2

Other courses can be taken with approval of program director.

Requirements List

Total Requirements: BS with a Major in Integrated Human Biology

Total Core Course Credits  76 
Total Programmatic Elective Credits    3 
Total Advanced Programmatic Elective Credits   11
Total Requirements   90 

This is the required number of lecture/lab hours, but students may take additional lab courses as advanced electives.

Curriculum and course changes in the 2016-2017 Bastyr University Catalog are applicable to students entering during the 2016-2017 academic year. Please refer to the appropriate catalog if interested in curriculum and courses required for any other entering year.

Basic Science Courses within Other Departments

Basic science courses within the School of Traditional World Medicines (TWM) include Anatomy and Physiology, Organic Chemistry, Biochemistry, Microbiology, Pathology and Pharmacology. These courses serve as a foundation for an understanding of the human body and provide students with the necessary skills and competencies to pursue coursework in the School of TWM. In addition, a portion of the AEAM Anatomy and Physiology course is taught in Bastyr’s cadaver anatomy lab, giving students the unique opportunity to study anatomy in greater depth.

Basic science modules within the naturopathic medicine program provide integration across science disciplines and with clinical coursework. First-year basic science modules provide a foundation of core principles in anatomy, histology, embryology, biochemistry and physiology that are integrated in the context of body systems. Second-year modules use the systems approach to integrate the principles of pathology, immunology and infectious diseases. Pharmacology is integrated with nutrition and botanical medicine. Throughout the curriculum, science concepts are applied to clinical situations through integrated case discussions. Basic science courses within the herbal sciences program include Anatomy and Physiology, Organic Chemistry, Biochemistry, Microbiology, Pharmacology, and Disease Processes. These courses serve as a foundation for an understanding of the human body and provide students with the necessary skills and competencies to pursue coursework in their chosen field.

Basic science courses within the School of Nutrition and Exercise Science include Anatomy and Physiology, Organic Chemistry, Biochemistry, Microbiology and Disease Processes. (Anatomy/Physiology, Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry are all prerequisite courses for the master’s program.)

Basic sciences courses within the clinical health psychology program include Anatomy and Physiology, Living Anatomy, Organic Chemistry, and Biochemistry.

The department also offers science courses that satisfy prerequisite requirements, including courses in General Chemistry, Organic Chemistry and Physics.

Lab Services

Laboratory Services provides laboratory set-up and support for all laboratory courses in all academic programs. Laboratory Services also trains TAs and work-study students for academic and research labs and maintains safety oversight of all laboratories.