Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine

Naturopathic medicine is a distinct profession of primary health care, emphasizing prevention, treatment and the promotion of optimal health through the use of therapeutic methods and modalities that encourage the self-healing process, the vis medicatrix naturae.

Mission

We educate naturopathic primary care physicians who care for the health and well-being of their communities, through education, research, leadership and clinical services. Respecting the naturopathic principles, we integrate science, nature and spirit.

Vision

The School of Naturopathic Medicine will be a leading academic center for inspired and scholarly learning in the cultivation of naturopathic doctors. It will accomplish this through education, research, professional leadership, and community and clinical services that bridge the worlds of science, nature and spirit.

Expected Program Outcomes

A graduate of the naturopathic medical program at the School of Naturopathic Medicine, Bastyr University, will be able to: 

  • demonstrate competency in biomedical and clinical sciences in order to practice safely and effectively as a naturopathic physician.
  • provide patient-centered clinical services as a naturopathic primary care physician.
  • apply the philosophy and principles of naturopathic medicine to efficiently and effectively practice naturopathic primary care.
  • uphold ethical standards and demonstrate respect and integrity in professional interactions.
  • apply information literacy skills to efficiently and effectively practice evidence-informed naturopathic primary care.
  • demonstrate cultural humility through self-awareness and a commitment to engage in culturally-responsive naturopathic practice in their communities.
  • cultivate the development and dissemination of new knowledge in naturopathic medicine through education, scholarship and research.

Definition and Description of Naturopathic Medicine

The U.S. Department of Labor defines naturopathic physicians as doctors who "diagnose, treat and help prevent diseases using a system of practice that is based on the natural healing capacity of individuals. May use physiological, psychological or mechanical methods. May also use natural medicines, prescription or legend drugs, foods, herbs or other natural remedies."

Most naturopathic physicians provide natural medicine primary care through office-based, private practice. Many receive additional training in disciplines or modalities such as acupuncture and East Asian medicine.

Naturopathic diagnosis and therapeutics are supported by scientific research drawn from peer-reviewed journals from many disciplines, including naturopathic medicine, conventional medicine, European complementary medicine, clinical nutrition, phytotherapy, pharmacognosy, homeopathy, psychology and spirituality. Information technology and new concepts in clinical outcomes assessment are particularly well-suited to evaluating the effectiveness of naturopathic treatment protocols and are being used in research, both at naturopathic medical schools and in the offices of practicing physicians. Clinical research into natural therapies has become an increasingly important focus for naturopathic physicians.

Principles of Naturopathic Medicine

The underpinnings of naturopathic medical practice are embodied in six principles:

  • First Do No Harm – primum non nocere
  • The Healing Power of Nature – vis medicatrix naturae
  • Discover and Treat the Cause – tolle causam
  • Treat the Whole Person – tolle totum
  • The Physician as Teacher – docere
  • Prevention Is the Best Medicine – praevenire

Scope of Practice

Naturopathic medicine is defined by principles, rather than by methods or modalities. Diagnostic and therapeutic methods are diverse. The current scope of practice for a naturopathic physician varies by jurisdiction. However, the accredited naturopathic programs all train primary care naturopathic physicians who diagnose, treat and manage patients with acute and chronic medical conditions and diagnoses. Treatment may include, but is not limited to: nutritional science, natural hygiene, botanical medicine, naturopathic physical medicine, homeopathy, counseling, spirituality, minor office procedures, and methods of laboratory and clinical diagnosis. The scope of practice is defined by state or provincial statute. The curriculum at Bastyr University trains students to the broadest scope, except for acupuncture. Graduates meet the requirements for licensure in Washington and California. Students have the responsibility to become informed on licensure and scope of practice in the legal jurisdiction in which they choose to practice.

Legal Status of Naturopathic Medicine

Naturopathic physicians are licensed or registered as health care providers in Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Hawaii, Idaho, Kansas, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Montana, New Hampshire, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Utah, Vermont, Washington, and the U.S. territories of Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. Legal provisions allow the practice of naturopathic medicine in several other states. Efforts to gain licensure elsewhere are currently underway. Forty-two states and territories in the United States have professional associations for naturopathic medicine. Naturopathic medicine is regulated in the following Canadian provinces: Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario and Saskatchewan. The Naturopathic Doctors Act of 2008 grants title protection for naturopathic doctors in Nova Scotia. There are 11 provincial and territorial professional associations.

Naturopathic Medicine Licensure Requirements

All states and provinces with naturopathic medicine licensure laws require completion of a residential program of at least four years and 4,100 hours of study from a college or university recognized by the Council on Naturopathic Medical Education (CNME). Bastyr University's doctoral program in naturopathic medicine is accredited by CNME, and a copy of the CNME Handbook of Accreditation is available in the Bastyr Library and online at www.cnme.org

To qualify for a license, applicants must satisfactorily pass the Naturopathic Physicians Licensing Examinations (NPLEX), which include basic sciences, diagnostic and therapeutic subjects, and clinical sciences. Applicants must also satisfy all licensing requirements for the state or province in which they wish to practice. Students are responsible for contacting the department of health or other governing agency for information regarding requirements for the state in which they are seeking licensure.

Professional Organizations

The American Association of Naturopathic Physicians, based in Washington, D.C., represents the interests of the profession of naturopathic medicine in the U.S. The Canadian Association of Naturopathic Doctors is the professional association in Canada. Contact the appropriate national association for further information.

  • American Association of Naturopathic Physicians, 818 18th St. NW, Suite 250, Washington, D.C., 20006, www.naturopathic.org, (202) 237-8150
  • Canadian Association of Naturopathic Doctors, 20 Holly St., Suite 200, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M4S 3B1, www.cand.ca, (416) 496-8633

Transfer and Advanced Standing Students Admissions

Transfer Students

Bastyr University accepts transfer students from naturopathic, medical, osteopathic and chiropractic schools, and other accredited professional programs, on a space-available basis. For transfer consideration, credits must be earned from an institution accredited by a regional accrediting agency or from an institution accredited by the Council on Naturopathic Medical Education (CNME). Transfer students are considered for admission in accordance with the following general guidelines:

  • Applicants must meet the same entrance requirements as candidates for the first-year class.
  • Applicants who wish to transfer credits from prior coursework must demonstrate satisfactory completion of courses that are equivalent in content and quality to courses given at the University. Satisfactory completion equals a grade of achieved competency, a C or above, or a 2.0 or above.
  • Applicants must provide an official transcript from the college or program from which the transfer is being requested; the transcript should demonstrate that they are leaving in good academic standing. They should be prepared to submit additional documentation to support a thorough evaluation.
  • Transfer applicants must submit a $150 transfer evaluation fee.
  • Transfer applicants from another CNME-approved naturopathic medical program may transfer up to 40 percent of the total number of credits required for graduation from the Bastyr University naturopathic medical program in addition to completing most or all of their clinical work at Bastyr University. 
  • Transfer applicants who can demonstrate passing of the NPLEX-1 exam may be able to transfer all of the first and second year basic science classes at once without providing syllabi.

Advanced Standing Status Based on Prior Medical Education

Applicants who graduated from accredited chiropractic, medical or osteopathic colleges may be eligible for advanced standing in the Bastyr University naturopathic medicine program. Up to one third of the curriculum may be transferred; students must complete at least two-thirds of the program and do all of their clinical work at Bastyr University. 

In those instances where the maximum number of advanced standing transfer credits is granted, it will take a minimum of three years (11 quarters) to complete the program. Placement depends upon the amount of coursework completed in the original program, similarity of the course content and credits, age of the courses, and performance in these courses. A student must provide documentation showing that the competencies of the Bastyr University course have been met. Course waivers and/or credit transfers are considered only for those courses in which applicants demonstrate a grade of achieved competence, a C or above, or a 2.0 or above. An exam to determine competency may also be required. Advanced standing applicants must complete all of the course and credit requirements in effect at the time of their enrollment in the Bastyr University naturopathic medicine program. Final waiver and/or transfer credit decisions rest with the dean of the school in which the curriculum is taught.

Advanced standing is determined on a case-by-case basis and depends on the type of degree program completed, the courses taken and the number of years in practice.

Applicants who are eligible for advanced standing must submit a $150 advanced standing evaluation fee after admission to the program.

Applicants who can demonstrate successful completion of the USMLE Step 1 exam, or the equivalent osteopathic exam, within the past seven years may have all the first and second year basic science credits transferred at once, without providing individual course syllabi. However the non-basic science credits are not transferable. Decisions will be made on a case-by-case basis for those who passed board exams more than seven years ago.

Applicants with coursework taken at an accredited university within the last seven years can apply for transfer credit on a course-by-course basis. Applicants can apply for waiver credit based on their experience. Since students need to pass NPLEX 1, we strongly recommend that they consider the full four-year track. They should start on the four-year track and then petition, course by course, once they are enrolled.

Naturopathic Medicine Dual Degrees

There are a number of degree options that allow students in the naturopathic medicine program to earn a second degree. Students in good standing wishing to pursue a dual degree should realize that adding a second program will extend the time they spend in their original program by a year or more. Most of the dual-degree programs enable graduating with the ND and a master’s degree in a total of five years, if the student stays on track. Students must also maintain good standing in all programs while pursuing multiple degrees. The midwifery degree option is a minimum of six years.

Currently the following programs may be considered: Acupuncture and East Asian Medicine, Counseling and Health Psychology, Midwifery, and Public Health. For additional information regarding the dual degrees, please contact the admissions department. A formal application to the individual programs through the admissions department must be completed. 

Students with advanced medical training, e.g., DC, DO or MD, must successfully complete the first year of study in their original program before acceptance into a second program.

Integrated Curriculum Design

The naturopathic medicine program at Bastyr University is taught in a systems-based approach designed to provide integration across scientific disciplines and between biomedical and clinical sciences. This approach fosters the development of critical clinical reasoning through an active learning environment. Naturopathic medical students are expected to be able to preview learning materials and gain a basic understanding before coming to class to apply the information (the “flipped classroom”). The integrated curriculum also takes advantage of hybrid learning in which online educational technology is paired with face-to-face learning, to provide the student with flexible learning time and varied methods of instruction to support different types of learners.

Students entering this program should be comfortable with computer technologies and programs. It is strongly advised that students have a personal computing device with Internet access and the common word processing and associated programs in order to fully participate in hybrid learning.

Basic Sciences

Basic and biomedical science modules within the naturopathic medicine program provide integration across science disciplines and with clinical coursework. First-year basic science modules provide a foundation of core principles in anatomy, histology, embryology, biochemistry and physiology that are integrated in the context of body systems. Second-year modules use the systems approach to integrate the principles of pathology, immunology and infectious diseases. Throughout the curriculum, science concepts are applied to clinical situations through integrated case discussions.

The basic science faculty encourages and expects students to advance beyond the simple learning of scientific facts and to integrate systematically the information from basic science disciplines into a unified model of human organization and function. This educational scheme requires students to assume an active role in the learning process and encourages them to adopt this inquisitive behavior for a lifetime. Problem solving, clinical cases and examples are an integral part of the basic science curriculum. This educational process is an expression of Bastyr University’s basic philosophy of a holistic approach to human behavior, health and therapeutics. The basic science faculty encourages students to become totally absorbed in an integrated approach to learning and understanding. Instructors are readily available to facilitate this process on an individual basis.

The department also offers science courses that satisfy prerequisite requirements, including courses in General Chemistry and Organic Chemistry.

Behavioral Medicine

By definition, naturopathic medicine is a comprehensive, whole-person, integrative form of medicine which recognizes the behavioral, socio/cultural/political, cognitive, and emotional factors in health. The emerging field of behavioral medicine views health and illness through an interdisciplinary lens that integrates biomedical, psychosocial and behavioral sciences. The behavioral medicine curriculum within the naturopathic medicine program provides training in the development of the patient-physician therapeutic alliance, understanding of the biological basis of lifestyle change and behavior, the psychosocial factors of chronic disease, the socio-cultural determinants of health, and psychophysiology and mind-body medicine, all within the context of a primary care naturopathic physician. Courses in Behavioral Medicine are offered in conjunction with the Department of Counseling and Health Psychology.

Botanical Medicine

Botanical medicine is a core modality for naturopathic physicians to use in optimizing the health and well-being of their patients. Medicinal plants have been used as food and medicine by all peoples on all continents. The importance of plants to humans has been recorded in cave paintings 60,000 years old. A contemporary renaissance in herbal medicine weds traditional use and wisdom with modern analytical methodologies for optimal medical applications for today. Empirical knowledge of plant therapeutics is based on Western and holistic thought, rather than reductionist paradigms, and is linked with contemporary scientific knowledge.

The core curriculum in botanical medicine for naturopathic medical students covers fundamental plant identification and nomenclature, pharmacognosy, therapeutic actions, extraction principles, dosage considerations, contraindications, toxicology, herb-drug interactions, clinical applications, and treatment regimens. Clinical therapeutics draw from traditional uses, naturopathic formulae and use, and from international scientific and clinical research, as well as advances in phytotherapy. Herbal medicine making is incorporated into the third-year systems modules, which focus on treatment. Completion of the required curriculum, along with the required clinical experience, prepares the student for effective and safe clinical utilization of preventive and therapeutic botanicals.

A variety of botanical medicine elective and special topic courses are offered to students in the naturopathic medicine program and other programs, along with independent study options.

The Bastyr University Gardens are managed by the botanical medicine department, with support from the University and donations. The gardens are maintained primarily by the garden supervisor, assistant supervisors and work-study students. The botanical medicine department continues to build an herbarium, although the vast University of Washington herbarium is used as one of Bastyr’s teaching venues. The department supports a botanical medicine lab to expand class experience and provide a space for students to continue exploring their work and passion for herbs.

Clinical Sciences

Clinical sciences provide training in the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to become a competent naturopathic physician. Systems-based modules use case-based teaching to help students use critical clinical thinking to understand human disease, promote health, and prevent and treat illness. Evidence-informed practice and the naturopathic principles, therapeutic order and fundamentals of health are all part of the identification and management of disease and the obstacles to cure. This includes the traditional “ologies” (pulmonology, gastroenterology, neurology, etc.) as well as diet and nutrient therapy, botanical medicine formulation, clinical pharmacology, diagnostic testing and imaging, and problem-focused physical exam skills.

Homeopathic Medicine

Homeopathic medicine is a gentle non-toxic therapy that is one of the naturopathic medicine modalities. Homeopathic medicines stimulate a person’s inherent healing mechanisms. The entire range of mental, emotional and physical symptoms is considered with each patient and the remedy is then chosen that addresses the complex pattern of the patient, while emphasizing the uniqueness of the individual.

The homeopathic curriculum at Bastyr University includes the basic principles and philosophy of homeopathy, materia medica of commonly used homeopathic medicines, use of the homeopathic repertory, taking a homeopathic case and homeopathic case analysis. Practical therapeutics for common medical conditions are incorporated into the systems modules in the third year, focused on treatment.

Nutrition

Naturopathic doctors believe that food is your best medicine. Part of every treatment plan is supporting the fundamentals of health, such as diet, exercise, sleep and relationships. The nutrition curriculum in the naturopathic medicine program includes exploring the relationship with food, dietary assessment, macro and micro nutrients, and diet and nutrient therapy for the common presenting concerns seen in naturopathic practice. 

Physical Medicine

Physical medicine is an integral part of naturopathic medicine. It includes various modalities, such as hydrotherapy, osseous and soft-tissue manipulation, sports medicine and therapeutic exercise. The course of study and clinical training in physical medicine enable students to develop a solid foundation for entry into the practice of naturopathic medicine. The curriculum offers sufficient hours in manipulation to satisfy the state of Washington’s licensing requirement as a naturopathic physician.

The physical medicine curriculum begins by teaching students the art of touch and palpation, introduction to basic Swedish massage techniques and soft-tissue manipulation, and then progresses to osseous manipulation.

Summer Massage Intensive

Bastyr University and Bellevue Massage School offer students a summer massage training program that allows them to apply coursework taken at Bastyr University toward the state requirements for massage licensure. This course cannot be audited.

Students interested in further information may meet with their academic advisor in the registrar’s office or with their department’s program supervisor to discuss program availability and the course prerequisites.

Electives Requirements

Students in the naturopathic medicine program are required to complete 8 elective credits (included in the 299.5 credit totals) during their course of study. Up to 3 of these credits may be satisfied by independent study. It is recommended that elective credits be spread out over the length of the student’s program. Courses designated as elective and special topics may fulfill this 8-credit requirement, as well as additional clinic shifts during the student’s clinical training. A maximum of 3 elective credits from any one discipline may be used to satisfy the naturopathic medicine program elective requirement. The rule of a 3-credit maximum does not apply to elective credits being taken to satisfy waived credits. Elective credits covering waived course credits may be from any discipline. A student may take elective credits from any program/department.

Clinical Entrance Prerequisites

Questions about didactic prerequisites for clinical ND training should be addressed to the registrar’s office on campus. Students must also have completed TB screening, received a hepatitis B vaccination or signed a waiver, have a current First Aid and CPR card, and submit to a national criminal background check. The criminal background check will be conducted prior to enrolling in clinical shifts. For more information, see Felony Conviction Disclosure and Background Checks in the Academic Policy and Procedure Manual.  Students will also be required to pass a Clinic Entry Assessment at the end of their second year.

Clinic Requirements

Students in the four-year program begin clinical training in their first year. Clinical training begins with observation, in which the student follows supervisors through their rotations. The next year clinical training builds to active observation, with clinical skills demonstrated by the student and evaluated by the supervisor. The training supports students to gradually and continually develop and expand their clinical skills and competence throughout their roles as early, intermediate and experienced student clinicians. Students are required to successfully complete a minimum of 1,204 hours of clinical training. Students must pass a Clinic Exit Assessment at the end of their fourth year. 

Graduation Requirements

The curriculum of the naturopathic medicine program requires completion of 299.5 credits for graduation. This includes 239.5 core course credits, 8 elective credits and 52 clinical credits. Students must achieve competency (grade of AC) in all 299.5 credits required in the curriculum. Students must complete all required clinical competencies in order to graduate. Students must complete at least two-thirds of their credits in residence at Bastyr University. All requirements must be completed within a total of six years. Students may petition for an additional year by writing a letter to the dean. These may be granted in cases of medical or family emergencies.

Naturopathic Medicine Four-Year Program Track

At the time of enrollment, all naturopathic medicine students are registered for the four-year track. Students are required to follow the approved program track. Any deviation from the program track, including adding or dropping required classes, must have prior approval from the associate dean of academics.

Naturopathic Medicine Extended Program Tracks

Students who are accepted into the program and decide not to complete the program in four years must choose one of the following approved options:

  • Extended Track - Preclinical Option
  • Extended Track - Clinical Option

At the time of enrollment, naturopathic medicine students are registered for the four-year track. Students in their preclinical training who wish to change to an extended track must complete the ND change of status form (available in the registrar’s office) and then meet with their registrar advisor, room 259. Changes may affect financial aid packages as well as the sequencing of courses. This five-year track extends the first two years of preclinical training into three years. As long as a student remains on an approved program track, there should be no course scheduling conflicts. Students must remain on track in order to graduate on time. Students may not register off track or ahead of track without approval from the associate academic dean.

Community medicine is training obtained at other than our teaching clinics. This occurs in external sites as well as in preceptor opportunities. Student clinicians can choose to do rotations in external sites that serve specific populations, such as Spanish Language, people experiencing homelessness, seniors, immigrant populations and high school students. Preceptorships are opportunities to work with practicing naturopathic physicians and other provides in their clinics.

Post-Graduate Medicine refers to Bastyr’s residency program, which is continued training for graduates of the ND program. Bastyr oversees over 30 residency sites located in Arizona, California, Connecticut, Hawaii, Indiana, Montana, Vermont, Utah, Washington, and British Columbia, Canada, and includes our teaching clinics in Seattle and San Diego. 

Students who have completed their first two years or have been accepted into a second clinical degree program may change to the extended track–clinical option. Students must complete the ND change of status form (available in the Office of the Registrar) and then meet with their academic advisor. Changes may affect financial aid packages as well as the sequencing of courses. This five-year track extends the second two years of the program into three. As long as a student remains on an approved program track, there should be no course scheduling conflicts. Students must remain on track in order to graduate on time. Students may not register off track or ahead of track without approval from the associate academic dean.

The curriculum tables that follow list the tentative schedule of courses each quarter.

Year I

Fall

BC5122LGross Human Anatomy 1 Lab

1

BC5142Fundamentals of Research Design

2

BC5148Integrated Muscular and Skeletal Systems Lecture/Lab

7

BC5150Integrated Structure and Function Lecture/Lab

8.5

BP5400Therapeutic Alliance 1

1

NM5140Constitutional Assessment

2

NM5141Naturopathic Theory and Practice 1

2

SN5100Clinical Skills Lab 1

1

SN5103Integrated Case Studies 1

1

NM5820Clinic Observation 1

1

Total Credit Hours:26.5

BC5142 is offered summer, winter in Kenmore, Washington; fall and winter in San Diego, California

NM5140 is offered summer both in Kenmore and San Diego

NM5820 is offered also in winter or spring

Winter

BC5123LGross Human Anatomy 2 Lab

1

BC5152Integrated Cardiovascular and Immune Systems

5.5

BC5153Integrated Respiratory System

4.5

BC5154Integrated Digestive System

4.5

BC5161Physiology Seminar

1

BP5401Therapeutic Alliance 2

1

NM5142Naturopathic Theory and Practice 2

2

PM5314Physical Medicine 1

1

PM5314LPhysical Medicine Lab 1

1

SN5101Clinical Skills Lab 2

1

SN5104Integrated Case Studies 2

1

Total Credit Hours:23.5

Spring

BC5124LGross Human Anatomy 3 Lab

1

BC5155Integrated Endocrine System and Metabolism

4.5

BC5156Integrated Renal and Reproductive Systems

4

BC5157Integrated Nervous System

7

BC5162Physiology Seminar

1

BP5402Fundamentals of Behavioral Medicine

2.5

NM5143Naturopathic Theory and Practice 3

2

PM5316Physical Medicine 2

1

PM5316LPhysical Medicine Lab 2

0.5

SN5102Clinical Skills Lab 3

1

SN5105Integrated Case Studies 3

1

Total Credit Hours:25.5

Year II

Fall

BC6107Integrated Pathology, Immunology and Infectious Diseases 1

8

BO6305Botanical Medicine Lab

1

BO6400Botanical Materia Medica 1

2

BP6300Behavioral Medicine Theories and Interventions 1

2.5

HO6305Homeopathy 1

1.5

NM6110Naturopathic Theory and Practice 4

0.5

NM6303Nutrition Principles 1: Assessment, Education and Micronutrients

3

NM6310Naturopathic Clinical Diagnosis 1

4

NM6315Physical Exam Diagnosis Lab 1

1

NM6320Clinical Diagnosis Lab 1

1

PM6305Physical Medicine 3

2

SN6100Integrated Case Studies 4

0.5

NM6810Clinic Observation 2*

2

Total Credit Hours:29.0

NM6810 is also offered in summer.

Winter

BC6108Integrated Pathology, Immunology and Infectious Diseases 2

7

BO6401Botanical Materia Medica 2

2

BP6200Psychopathology

2

HO6306Homeopathy 2

2

NM6111Naturopathic Theory and Practice 5

0.5

NM6304Nutrition Principles 2: Micronutrients

2.5

NM6311Naturopathic Clinical Diagnosis 2

4

NM6316Physical Exam Diagnosis Lab 2

1

NM6321Clinical Diagnosis Lab 2

1

PM6306Physical Medicine 4

3

SN6101Integrated Case Studies 5

0.5

Total Credit Hours:25.5

Spring

BC6109Integrated Pathology, Immunology and Infectious Diseases 3

6

BC6112Medical Pharmacology

3

BO6402Botanical Materia Medica 3

2

BP6301Behavioral Medicine Theories and Interventions 2

2

HO6307Homeopathy 3

2

NM6112Naturopathic Theory and Practice 6

0.5

NM6312Naturopathic Clinical Diagnosis 3

4

NM6317Physical Exam Diagnosis Lab 3

1

NM6322Clinical Diagnosis Lab 3

1

NM6325Fundamentals of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging

2

PM6310Physical Medicine 5

2

SN6102Integrated Case Studies 6

0.5

NM6820Clinic Entrance Assessment

Total Credit Hours:26.0

Year III

Summer

BO7400Botanical Medicine Formulation Lab 1

0.5

NM7111Coding and Billing

1

NM7326Medical Procedures 1 Lecture/Lab

2

NM7332Clinical Pharmacology 1

0.5

NM7347Pediatric Therapeutics 1

0.5

NM7355Orthopedics and Musculoskeletal System

3

NM7403Diet and Nutrient Therapy 1

0.5

PM7309Physical Medicine 6

2

Clinic Rotation (1)

2

Total Credit Hours:12.0

Fall

BO7306Botanical Medicine Formulation Lab 2

1

BP7300Naturopathic Approaches to Addictions

2

HO7300Homeopathy 4

1.5

NM7333Clinical Pharmacology 2

0.5

NM7346Maternity and Pediatrics

4.5

NM7348Pediatric Therapeutics 2

1

NM7356Endocrine System Therapeutics

3.5

NM7357Mental Health and Nervous System

4

NM7365Advanced Case Studies 1

0.5

NM7404Diet and Nutrient Therapy 2

1

PM7311Physical Medicine 7

2

NM8801Preceptorship 1

1

Clinic Rotation (1)

2

Total Credit Hours:24.5

Winter

BO7307Botanical Medicine Formulation Lab 3

1

HO7301Homeopathy 5

1

NM7142Critical Evaluation of the Medical Literature

2

NM7330Healing Systems

1

NM7334Clinical Pharmacology 3

0.5

NM7338Environmental Medicine

1.5

NM7349Pediatric Therapeutics 3

1.5

NM7358Cardiovascular Therapeutics

3.5

NM7359Respiratory Therapeutics

2

NM7360Digestive Therapeutics

2.5

NM7366Advanced Case Studies 2

0.5

NM7405Diet and Nutrient Therapy 3

2.5

Clinic Rotation (1 or 2)

2-4

Total Credit Hours:21.5-23.5

NM7142 may also be offered spring quarter.

Spring

BO7308Botanical Medicine Formulation Lab 4

1

NM7113Jurisprudence

1

NM7335Clinical Pharmacology 4

0.5

NM7350Pediatric Therapeutics 4

1.5

NM7361Renal System Therapeutics

1.5

NM7362Urology and Male Reproductive

1

NM7363Urology and Female Reproductive

3.5

NM7364EENT Therapeutics

2

NM7367Advanced Case Studies 3

0.5

NM7406Diet and Nutrient Therapy 4

2

Clinic Rotation (1 or 2)

2-4

Total Credit Hours:16.5-18.5

Year IV

Summer

BO8302Botanical Medicine Formulation Lab 5

0.5

NM8300lntegumentary System Therapeutics

2

NM8301Clinical Pharmacology 5

0.5

NM8310Medical Procedures 2 Lecture/Lab

2

NM8313Advanced Case Studies 4

0.5

NM8320Pediatric Therapeutics 5

0.5

NM8411Diet and Nutrient Therapy 5

0.5

Clinic Rotation (4)

8

Total Credit Hours:14.5

Fall

NM8100Advanced Medical Ethics

0.5

NM8105Advanced Business Practices 1

2

NM8316Advanced Topics in Public Health

1

NM8317Advanced Topics in Geriatric Medicine

2

NM8815Grand Rounds 1

1

NM8802Preceptorship 2

1

Clinic Rotation (4)

8

Total Credit Hours:15.5

Winter

NM8106Advanced Business Practices 2

0.5

NM8311Rheumatologic Disorders

2

NM8318Advanced Topics in Clinical Ecology

1

NM8319Advanced Topics in Oncology

2.5

NM8816Grand Rounds 2

1

Clinic Rotation (4)

8

Total Credit Hours:15.0

Spring

NM8817Grand Rounds 3

1

NM8803Preceptorship 3

1

NM8890Clinic Exit Assessment

Clinic Rotation (4)

8

Total Credit Hours:10

Summary of Clinic Requirements

NM5820Clinic Observation 1

1

NM6810Clinic Observation 2*

2

NM7820-7829Patient Care Rotations 1-10

20

NM8801-8803Preceptorship 1-3

3

NM8830-8837Patient Care Rotations 11-18

16

NM8844Interim Patient Care

2

PM7801-7802Physical Medicine 1-2

4

PM8801-8802Physical Medicine 3-4

4

Total Credit Hours:52

NM7820-29, NM8830-37, PM7801-2, PM8801-2: Quarterly shift assignments are based on availability. 

Elective Requirements

Elective and Special Topics

8

Total Credit Hours:8

Curriculum and course changes in the 2020-2021 Bastyr University Catalog are applicable to students entering during the 2020-2021 academic year. Please refer to the appropriate catalog if interested in curriculum and courses required for any other entering year.

Total Requirements

  Credits  Clock hours
Total Core Course Credits  239.5    3008.5
Total Elective Credits     8       88
Total Clinic Credits     52    1204
Total Requirements   299.5    4300.5

Total Credit Hours: 60